Apple Creek fishing Report:  Apple Creek was stocked October 14, 2017 with ca. 450 good-sized rainbow and brown trout and on November 18 with ca. 300 rainbows and browns over a one mile stretch of Apple Creek.  Reports from fly anglers indicate trout are taking streamer patterns, nymphs and egg patterns.  Fishing has been especially good after water levels have dropped after heavy rainfalls, such as when the trout were stocked on November 18.  Look for fish in deep runs and pools.  Nearly all anglers are practicing catch and release.  If you observe anglers harvesting trout, please remind them that the fishery can be sustained only if everyone releases their catch. (reported by Skip Nault, 11/27/17).

The water has dropped and the water is very, very clear.  The trout are very spooky.  Some success has been reported with dry flies.  Might try a dry/dropper combination, 12/1/17.

 

Apple Creek Fishery

In 1998, the Walter Grosjean family donated 80 acres of undeveloped land bordering Rt 30 (E. Lincoln Way) to the city of Wooster for a park. The land is in a flood plain and cannot be developed for playgrounds, ball fields, etc. A one-mile stretch of Apple Creek runs through Grosjean Park. A wooded riparian zone borders the stream.

The Apple Creek watershed drains 55.2 square acres, all from Wayne County, and eventually flows into Killbuck Creek. Apple Creek is a freestone stream fed by numerous springs that keep the water cool during summer months and prevents the stream from completely freezing over during the coldest winter months. Heavy rainstorms overflow the banks of the stream and flood portions of Grosjean Park.

The section of Apple Creek that flows through the Park has never been channelized (straightened) and fallen timber never removed from the stream. Thus, the stream channel meanders through the Park. Fallen trees in the stream divert water in the gravel and sand streambed to form deep holes and runs providing excellent habitat for game fish.

Beginning in 2005, the CFRTU chapter teamed with the City of Wooster and the Ohio Division of Wildlife to create a trout fishery In Apple Creek. That year the stream was successfully stocked with about 1,000 rainbow trout. Since then, the stream has been stocked every year with rainbow and brown trout averaging 14-15 inches in length. Funds from the CFRTU chapter, the City of Wooster and grants from the DOW Outdoor Education program are used to purchase fish from a private fish hatchery in Castalia. The stream is stocked twice in the fall. Free fly-fishing clinics for novice and beginning fly anglers, which are taught by CFRTU members, are offered the same days as the stockings.

Stocked trout survive in the stream all year.   Although some trout attempt to reproduce in the creek, creating redds (clearing spawning gravel) and laying eggs, stream sediment smothers the eggs, thus survival of offspring is doubtful.

Each year, school kids participating in the TU Trout in the Classroom program, sponsored by the CFRTU, raise fingerling rainbow trout as a class project and introduce them into Apple Creek in May and June. Some of these fingerlings are known to survive and thrive in the creek.

The CFRTU chapter strongly encourages Catch & Release fishing in Apple Creek, and use of barbless flies and lures. We discourage bait fishing, as trout swallowing baited hooks frequently are injured and do not survive release back into the stream. These practices help to sustain the fish population in the creek year around for a greater number of anglers to enjoy.

The stream harbors a rich invertebrate fauna, especially small caddis flies and mayflies as well as midges that nourish the trout. The stream also hosts large populations of a number of minnow species that serve as trout prey.

Fly anglers will find success with small dry fly patterns such as the Adams or nymph patterns such as hares ear, pheasant tail, prince and the rainbow warrior. Various streamers, especially white or black wooly buggers are effective fishing patterns.  At times, egg patterns in orange or pink can be effective.

All anglers 16 years of age and older must possess a valid Ohio fishing license.

We also encourage anglers to report their fishing results on this site. This information helps us to maintain and improve the fishery.

There is no USGS monitor on the stream to measure water flow and temperature. After rainstorms, Apple Creek clears before the upper portion of the Clear Fork River. A map of Grosjean Park is provided and the stretch of the stream that is stocked is marked with a yellow line. Several trails from the parking lot take anglers to the stream. Anglers wearing hip boots, waders or wet wading can reach the entire stream.

Map to Grosjean Park

 

Note that E Lincoln Way is US 30.  Exit US 30 at the Madison Ave. exit and drive north a short distance to Freedlander Rd.  Take a right on Freelander and drive to the Grosjean Park parking lot.  The stretch of Apple Creek stocked with trout is highlighted in yellow.

Apple Creek Watershed.  The blue P on the map indicates parking lot for Grosjean Park.

 

Apple Creek normal late spring flow.

Wood is Good!  Fallen timber in stream diverts water flow in stream bed to create runs and holes, great habitat for trout.

A nice Apple Creek rainbow.
A nice Apple Creek rainbow.
Apple Creek flooding after heavy rain storm.
Apple Creek flooding after heavy rain storms.
Renee Jackwood finds success on Apple Creek.
Renee Jackwood finds success on Apple Creek.
Rainbow trout form a spawning redd in Apple Creek. The female top left is pursued by two males. Note the trout have cleared out the algae and sediment from the spawning gravel.
Rainbow trout form a spawning redd in Apple Creek. The female top left is pursued by two males. Note the trout have cleared out the algae and sediment from the spawning gravel.
Skip Nault with a nice Apple Creek brown trout on the fly.
Skip Nault with a nice Apple Creek brown trout on the fly.
It's Catch & Release on Apple Creek.
It’s Catch & Release on Apple Creek.