Meat Whistle

Submitted By Skip Nault

Tyer Comments:

This fly was first designed by John Barr and modified by other tiers, as is this one. The meat whistle is a “crayfish” immitation and can be tied in many color variations. Intended as a bass fly, it will also take big brown trout as well and I bet that steelhead will take a bite. Fish by bouncing the fly on the bottom of the stream, lake or pond.

Materials

Hook: jig hook, size 1/0
Thread: color to match fly, 100 denier
Bead: medium brass cone
Tail: rabbit strip
Body: cross-cut rabbit strip
Wing: flashabouHackle: rubber legs
Other: marabou collar

Tying Instructions

After sliding on the brass conehead, make a dam of thread in front of hook,
push and glue cone in position and tie off. Retie thread above hook barb and
tie in 2-inch strip of rabbit strip. Then tie in strip of cross-cut rabbit strip,
bring thread up behind cone, palmer bunny strip up to the cone and tie in.
Cut off excess bunny strip. Then in order, just behind the cone, tie in
flashabou, three legs on each side, and finally two marabou tips, one on the
top and the other on the bottom of the hook. Can be tied in brown, tan,
olive, black or crayfish orange as shown here.

The following video shows each step in tying the Meat Whistle.

Meat Whistle

White Death

Submitted by Skip Nault

The white death is a fly pattern designed by Jeff Blood.  It is a zonker-style fly that imitates a dead emerald shiner.  It is fished in a dead drift like a nymph pattern and is effective when fishing for steelhead in Lake Erie tributaries.  It can be tied in colors other than white, such as black or olive and is a good fly on big browns on the Clear Fork River.  I have modified the fly by adding stick on eyes and attaching with UV Knot Sense.  See Jeff Blood tie the White Death on youtube.

Materials:

hook: 2XL streamer hook, #10-12

thread: black and red or orange

body: mylar tubing

upper body & tail: white rabbit strip

eyes: decal eyes glued on with Knot Sense (optional)

Tying instructions:

Start by taking out thread core of mylar tubing and cut length to match hook shank, and slide on hook.  Attach mylar to rear of hook with red or orange thread and then attach rabbit strip to end of shank with same thread, whip finish and cut thread.  Wrap black thread behind hook eye and secure mylar at front of hook.  Then tie in the rabbit strip at front of hook and build up a fat, black thread head, then whip finish and cut thread.  Attack decal eyes, cover with knot sense and cure with UV light.

White Death – dry
White Death – wet

 

 

Gander

Submitted By Jeff Miller

Tyer Comments:

I was introduced to this fly when I fished the Bow River in Alberta…It just looks like a fly that will catch fish (and it did…25″ Rainbow!). Deadly when fished on a sink tip.

Materials

Hook: 3-4xl Streamer, size 4-8
Thread: Brown
Tail: White Marabou
Underbody: Lead
WireBody: Natural or Natural Grizzly Rabbit
Wing: Deer Hair (Flared around the fly, tied as a collar)
Head: Gray, Gray/White or Olive Rams Wool, Clipped to form head

Tying Instructions

1) Tie in Marabou Tail and tinsel
2) Dub thick body
3) Tie in rabbit strip 2/3 way up the hook shank
4) Use tinsel to bind Rabbit overtop of body; let the rabbit strip extend beyond the back of the hook 2/3 the length of the shank
5) Wrap a deer hair collar directly in front of the rabbit strip, tied as a flared collar
6) Tie in rams wool and clip to form head
7) whip finish

Rainbow Warrior

submitted by Skip Nault

The rainbow warrior is a relatively easy tie.  The pattern was developed by Utah’s Lance Egan.  The fly works well in all sizes, but especially in small sizes to imitate midges.  The rainbow warrior works particularly well in Apple Creek during the colder months when trout are feeding heavily on midge pupae.  They can be fished under a strike indicator or in a dry/dropper combination using the Clown Shoe Caddis as the dry fly.

Tying materials:

hook: emerger #10-22

thread: red

bead: tungsten sized to hook

tail: pheasant tail fibers

abdomen & wing cover: medium pearl mylar

thorax: tan or rainbow scud dubbing

Tying instructions:

After placing hook with bead in vice, cover the hook with red thread.  Tie in tail.  Tie in tinsel behind bead and wrap tinsel back to base of tail and return thread to behind the bead.  Use overlapping turns of tinsel and wrap forward to behind bead.  Tie tag end of tinsel over top of fly and position to use as a wing cover.  Form a thorax with dubbing and then pull tinsel over the top to form a wing cover.  Tie a broad section of red thread behind bead as a hot spot and whip finish.  See video to tie Rainbow Warrior.

Rainbow Warrior

Eggstasy Egg pattern

Submitted By Skip Nault.

Tier Comments:  This pattern uses a next generation fiber, Eggstasy.  When wet, it gives a jelly-like appearance of a fish egg.  And it works especially well for recently stocked rainbow trout, and ought to work well on Lake Erie tributaries along Steelhead Alley.

Materials

Hook: Size 12 & 14, Barbless jig hooks
Thread:  Color to match or contrast with Eggstasy fibre
Bead:  Slotted tungsten silver bead to match hook size.
Body: Best colors are fluorescent cheese, fluorescent peach & pink salmon.

Tying Instructions

1)  Slide bead onto hook and place hook in vice.  Wrap tying thread from bead back to 1/3 of hook. Be certain to use tying thread to secure bead.  Cut a length of Eggstasy fiber several inches long.  The fiber is attached to a thread base.  Tie the Eggstasy 1/3 down hook to where you have tied in the thread base.  Wet fingers to pull fibers rearward, then wrap Eggstasy with 5 turns, ending at the base of tungsten bead.  Tie off there with several turns and whip finish.  You can apply head cement to the thread base prior to wrapping Eggstasy fiber.  For further instruction, I refer you to a video by Tim Camissa on how to tie this pattern.

Eggstasy egg pattern, dry
Eggstasy egg pattern wet

Purple Jesus

Submitted By Skip Nault

Tyer Comments:

One of the best flies over the years for steelhead.  The fly was designed many years ago by Jerry Darkes.  The fly imitates small to medium sized black stoneflies found in Ohio’s Lake Erie tributaries.  The fly also works well in inland trout streams.  Tying with tungsten bead gets fly quickly to bottom of stream.

Materials

Hook: Size 12-16 scud hooks

Thread: Black 8/0

Bead: Black tungsten, size matched to hook size

Tail: Black goose biots

Body:  Dubbed with Spirit River, light bright purple haze

Collar:  Black ostrich hurl

 Tying Instructions

1) Place Bead on Hook
2) Wrap thread to back of fly and attach biots
3) Twist dubbing on thread and wrap forward forming a tapered body.
4) Take 4-6 wraps of ostrich herl to form a collar behind bead and tie off.

Purple Jesus

Sparrow

Submitted By Skip Nault

Tyer Comments:

The original pattern was first tied by Jack Gartside many decades ago.  It was tied solely from the feathers of a partridge or ringneck pheasant skin.  Since then, tiers have created many variations of the pattern, some of which I will mention here.  This is a versatile pattern; it can be drifted like a nymph, swung through the water like a wetfly, or fished like a small streamer.

Materials

Hook: Nymph hook, #6-14, 2x long
Thread:  Black 8/0, or color to match pattern
Tail: Pheasant or partridge rump marabou
Body: Dubbing can vary from natural to synthetic
Collar:  Rump hackle

Head: Aftershaft feather

Tying Instructions

1) Tie in Tail, 1/4 to no more than length of hook.
2) Dub tying thread and advance forward with wraps that increase taper as body is built from tail forward.  You can add small wire to wrap over dubbing.
3) Use rump hackle to tie in collar to reach back to just beyond the base of the tail.
4) Tie in the aftershaft feather by the base of the feather and take several wraps to create a bushy head.  The feather is very delicate, the tip easily breaks off.  Be patient!  To add weight to the fly, add lead wraps over hook or a bead in front of the aftershaft head.

This sparrow was tied with feathers from a ringneck pheasant and gold wire ribbing.

This sparrow is tied with light purple iced and blue wire ribbing.

Foam and Parachute Emerger

Submitted By Skip Nault

Tyer Comments:

Buoyed by its foam wing and parachute hackle, the front end of this
mayfly emerger pattern rides high, while the abdomen and “shuck”
dip below in the water. The fly can be tied in a number of different
colors and sizes to imitate many mayfly species.

Materials

Hook: Fine wire scud hook, sizes 12 through 18.
Thread: 6/0 or 8/0
Tail: Antron fibers to imitate schuck
Abdomen: Dry fly dubbing
Thorax: Dry fly dubbing
Parachute: 1 mm white foam (or other indicator colors
Hackle: Brown, grizzly and other fine hackle
Head: Thread head

Tying Instructions

Begin by tying in tip of foam strip behind the hook eye leaving space for the thread head.
Place tying thread behind the foam strip, then form an upside down “U” with the foam and tie
it down. Cut off excess foam, then use tying thread to form a post for the parachute wing.
Wrap thread back to and including a portion of the curved scud hook. Tie in the antron husk
and then use dry fly dubbing to create the abdomen and thorax. Tie in hackle at the post
with clock-wise wraps of the tying thread, then wrap several turns of the hackle counter
clock-wise on the foam post. Tie off hackle, clip excess hackle feather, form a thread head,
whip finish and you are done!

Foam & Parachute emerger
Foam & Parachute emerger

Clown Shoe Caddis

submitted by Skip Nault

The Clown Shoe Caddis is a high floating, easy to see caddis imitation.  It can be used by itself or in a two fly combination where is serves as an indicator for a smaller dry fly or a dropper such as the Rainbow Warrior described in this section of the website.  Jay Zimmerman from Boulder, Colorado developed the pattern.

 

Tying Materials:

hook:  TMC 2487 or other curved dry fly hook

thread: olive 8/0, black 8/0

abdomen: small clear or olive v-rib

wing: light elk or deer hair

thorax: black super fine dubbing

hackle: grizzly saddle

indicator: McFlyFoam in cerise or hot orange

Tying Instructions:

Cover hook shank with olive thread. Tie in v-rib at slightly more than the half way point and wrap thread over rib partway over the bend of hook.  Wrap thread forward then using touching wraps, form abdomen with v-rib, then cut off excess v-rib, whip finish and cut off olive thread.  Tie in black thread.  Remove and stack a clump of elk or deer hair and tie in so tips reach curve of hook.  Tie in hackle feather just in front of where v-rib ends, then tie in a clump of McFlyFoam on top of fly and post the clump with thread.  Use dubbing to form thorax behind and in front of foam.  Wrap hackle behind and in front of foam and tie off, then form a thread head and whip finish.  Now stretch foam and cut off top to form the indicator.  Also use scissors to cut hackle fibers from bottom of the fly.  See video of Clown Shoe Caddis.

Clown Shoe Caddis

 

Royal Coachman

Tyer Comments:

This attractor pattern will take trout, bass and panfish. This pattern
floats like a cork and is easy to spot on the surface of the water.

Hook: TMC 200 3R, sizes 8 through 16
Thread: brown 6/0 or 8/0
Tail: golden pheasant tippets
Abdomen: 1/3 peacock herl, 1/3 red floss, 1/3 peacock
Wing: yellow kiptail, split for two wings
Hackle: brown

Tying Instructions

1) Cover hook with thread, 2) tie in tail, 3) next cover thread in front of hook with epoxy
(or hard as nails) then tie in kiptail hair wings and divide in two with figure 8 turns of
tying thread, 4) tie in 4 strands of peacock herl at tip of abdomen and wrap forward, then
red floss, then finish abdomen with peacock, 5) tie in brown hackle between peacock and
wings and wrap 6-8 times behind wing and then 4-5 wraps in front of wing, 6) finally
whip finish and cover thread with head cement.  This video for beginners shows steps to tie the Royal Coachman.

Royal Coachman